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Bücher
Titel: 
Person/en: 
Sprache/n: 
Englisch
Veröffentlichungsangabe: 
Singapore : Springer, [2019]
Umfang: 
xix, 302 Seiten ; 24 cm
Bibliogr. Zusammenhang: 
ISBN: 
978-981-329-114-0 Festeinband
Weitere Ausgaben: 978-981-329-115-7 (Fernzugriff)
Global Trade Item Number: 
9789813291140
Schlagwörter: 
Sachgebiete: 
Mehr zum Thema: 
Klassifikation der Library of Congress: K2146
Dewey Dezimal-Klassifikation: 347.014
Inhalt: 
Part 1: Introduction-developing principles of contemporary judging -- 1: The development of principles of contemporary judging -- 1.1: The challenge of articulating the role of courts -- 1.2: Judicial theory and the broader judicial studies context -- 1.3: The scope and limit of the inquiry -- 1.4: The structure of the book -- References -- Part II: The nature of the judicial function -- 2: Introduction to the judicial function -- 2.1: The limits of inquiry -- 2.2: The basic parameters of the judicial function -- References -- 3: The judicial form of dispute resolution -- 3.1: A taxonomy of dispute resolution methods -- 3.1.1: Resolution by reference to might-the battle -- 3.1.2: Resolution by reference to merit-the claim -- 3.1.3: Resolution by reference to change-the toss of the coin -- 3.2: The judicial form of third-party merit-based dispute -- References -- 4: Dispute-resolution and social governance -- 4.1.1: Dispute-resolution and governance through 'power' -- 4.1.2: Dispute-resolution and governance through 'Rules' -- 4.2: The judicial function and social governance -- 4.2.1: The judicial function and governmental power -- 4.2.2: The judicial function and governance through rules -- References -- 5: Articulating the judicial function -- 5.1: The inherent duality of the judicial function -- references -- Part III: 6: The judicial form of decision-making -- 6.1: A potted history of judicial methodology: Of testaments and reformations -- 6.1.1: The Old Testament - A declaratory role -- 6.1.2: The reformation: Orthodoxy challenged -- 6.1.3: The Counter-reformation -- 6.2: The Archetypal judge - re-conceiving the judicial ideal -- 6.2.1: Developing a new archetype: accepting irresolvable tension -- 6.3: guiding principles for contemporary judicial decision-making -- 6.3.1: The judicial method as a balance of freedom and constraint -- References -- 7: Law, merit and the development of a governing dispute-norm -- 7.1: The judicial reasoning process and the development of the dispute-norm -- 7.2 Existing legal normative statements and 'Source-based' reasoning -- 7.2.1: Source as a constraint -- 7.2.2 Source as guide: source-based aspects of judicial reasoning -- 7.3: Consistency and analogy reasoning -- 7.3.1: Consistency as a constraint -- 7.3.2: Consistency as guide - analogical reasoning n judicial decision-making -- 7.4 Coherence, legal principles and inductive reasoning -- 7.4.1: Coherence as a constraint -- 7.4.2: Coherence as a guide: 'Principle-based' judicial reasoning -- 7.5: Conclusion regarding legal reasoning -- References -- 8: The role and assessment of the factual circumstances -- 8.1: The nature of the factual circumstances -- 8.1.1: The problem of relevance -- 8.1.2 The problem of frame of reference -- 8.1.3: The problem of 'truth' and sufficiency of proof -- 8.1.4: the problem of practical process - The methods of factual assessment -- 8.2: Conclusion regarding the assessment of fact -- References -- 9: Evaluation and the application of law to fact -- 9.1: Judicial choice and the limits of logic -- 9.2: Influences in judicial evaluation, choice and justification -- 9.2.1: Influences regarding dispute-resolution -- 9.2.2: Influences regarding social (Normative) governance -- 9.3: Application and final determination -- 9.3.1: The final act of application and resolution -- 9.4: Correctness, justification and the importance of process in judicial decision-making -- References -- Part IV: Judicial impartiality, deviations, and threats to judicial method -- 10: Principles of judicial impartiality: Threats to the independence and impartiality of judges -- 10.1: The relationship between judicial independence and judicial impartiality -- 10.1.1: The origins of independence and impartiality -- 10.1.2: The interrelationship between the concepts: International statements and declarations -- 10.1.3: Competing conceptions of judicial independence -- 10.1.4: Independence as impartiality -- 10.2: The nature of judicial impartiality: Improper and unacceptable threats to judicial decision-making -- 10.3: Identifying threats to judicial impartiality -- 10.3.1: 'Influence' on judicial decision-making -- 10.3.2: 'Improper influence' and the judicial method -- 10.3.3: 'Unacceptable influence' and the judicial function -- 10.3.4: Conclusions regarding the identification of threats to judicial impartiality -- 10.4: Characterising threats to judicial impartiality -- 10.4.1: Implications form the flexible and dynamic nature of the concept -- References -- 11: Dispute-specific threats to impartiality -- 11.1: The nature and form of dispute-specific threats to impartiality -- 11.1.1: Appearance and perception of threat -- 11.2: Particular dispute-specific threats to impartiality -- 11.2.1: Material threats to impartiality -- 11.2.2: relationship threats to impartiality -- 11.2.3: Issue-based threats to impartiality -- References -- 12: Structural threats to impartiality -- 12.1: The nature and form of structural threats to impartiality -- 12.1.1: Characterising of threats to structural impartiality -- 12.2: Particular threats to & responses of structural impartiality -- 12.2.1: Threats to the judge as a person -- 12.2.2: Threats to the judicial 'job' -- 12.2.3: Threats to the judicial institution -- 12.2.4: Threats internal to the judicial institution -- 12.3: Conclusions regarding judicial impartiality -- References -- Part V: Judicial integrity and accountability -- 13: Principles of judicial integrity and accountability -- 13.1: The active promotion of adherence to the principles of judging -- 13.1.1: A concept often acclaimed, but too rarely considered -- 13.2: The scope of judicial accountability -- 13.2.1: Defining the concept of accountability' -- 13.3: The nature and purpose of judicial accountability -- 13.3.1: The relationship between the judicial function and judicial accountability -- 13.3.2: The ' External objective' and 'Internal subjective' aspects of accountability -- 13.3.3: The limits of judicial accountability -- 13.3.4: The relationship between judicial accountability and judicial impartiality -- 13.4: Final observation of the foundational principles of judicial accountability -- References -- 14: Mechanisms of accountability -- 14.1: Characterising mechanisms of accountability -- 14.1.1: Existing taxonomies for characterising judicial accountability mechanisms -- 14.1.2: a responsive taxonomy for characterising judicial accountability mechanisms -- 14.1.3: Defining the families of mechanisms -- 14.2: Personal conduct and behavior of the individual judge -- 14.2.1: The professional disciplining and sanctioning of judges -- 14.2.2: Immunity, civil and criminal liability -- 14.2.3: Informal social mechanisms of accountability --14.3: The substantive performance of the judicial role -- 14.3.1: 'Open justice' - Accountability through process -- 14.3.2: Judicial reasons - Accountability through justification -- 14.3.3: Judicial review and appeal - consistency, correctness and accountability -- 14.3.4: Internal processes - accountability through internal mechanisms -- 14.3.5: Criticism and critique - testing the merit of judicial determinations -- 14.4: Accountability for the administration and operation of the judicial institution -- 14.4.1: Financial and economic accountability -- 14.4.2: Judicial management, performance standards, and accountability -- 14.4.2: Institutional reporting mechanisms and accountability -- 14.5: Concluding remarks on judicial accountability -- References - Part VI: Conclusions - The idea of the court -- 15: The idea of a court -- 15.1: Defending the idea of courts -- 15.2: Understanding function requires a broad framework -- 15.3: Moving beyond the status quo - re-imagining the future of courts -- References
Judicial systems are under increasing pressure: from rising litigation costs and decreased accessibility, from escalating accountability and performance evaluation expectations, from shifting burdens of case management and alternative dispute resolution roles, and from emerging technologies. For courts to survive and flourish in a rapidly changing society, it is vital to have a clear understanding of their contemporary role - and a willingness to defend it
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